Can we squirrel?
No.

What is a squirrel?
December 20, 2009
What do we do when First Proposition squirrels?
December 20, 2009
Should we have an extension?
Yes.

What is an extension?
December 20, 2009
If First Opposition accepts the definition, can I then still challenge it?
No.

Can we counterprop?
No.

Should we stick to the counterprop that first opposition made?
December 20, 2009
What am I doing here?

Go to the debate. Write down the things the debaters say. Evaluate those things as honestly as you can, based on how persuasive they were to an unbiased intelligent observer. You then allocate speaker marks and positions accordingly. For the first six of the nine preliminary rounds, you give teams their positions (not speaker marks) and feedback. For the latter three rounds, you tell the teams you saw nothing at all until after the break has been announced.
December 20, 2009
The mark bands below are rough and general descriptions; speeches needn’t have every feature described to fit in a particular band: our job as judges is to find the best fit. Throughout this scale, ‘arguments’ refers both to constructive material and responses.

December 20, 2009
Following on from my earlier post on how the WUDC preliminary rounds work here is an overview on how the break works.
December 20, 2009
Can we squirrel?
No.

What is a squirrel?
December 20, 2009
Do I need to rebut every single thing the other side says?

No. British Parliamentary debating requires only that you engage with the important issues. You are absolutely allowed to pick your battles, and are allowed to make tactical concessions
December 20, 2009
How should I offer a point of information?
December 20, 2009

Pages

X